Top Five Washington D.C. Sights

Washington D.C. happens to be where decisions are made that effect every one of us. It’s where our elected leaders hold court and its where our country first began official business after the Revolutionary War. As such, most Americans make the pilgrimage at least once in their lives to soak in the framework of our day-to-day existence and perhaps come away with a better knowledge of our home country than we had before.

Emoting my views of the White House

It can also be a rough place if you don’t watch yourself, but hey, that’s any city. Below are five of my picks for the hottest spots in town, each with an array of pics, which you might want to visit on your American pilgrimage.

Museums

There are so many D.C. museums that it’s virtually impossible to visit them all in a week. It can take half a day to absorb each one. The National Gallery of Art is high on my list. They have a Leonardo da Vinci after all, and seeing the Genevra de Benci was simply unforgettable. The U.S. Botanic Garden is also a treasure to see, particularly the sinister Devil’s Tongue. But for the pulse of that American heart beat, visit the National Archives to drink in the Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights, and other documents that feed our country’s lifeblood. Beat feet to the Capitol Building and take a tour of democracy in action or trek along the outdoor museum that is the National Mall. To feel history tug at your mind and heart, always visit the Holocaust Museum and listen to the lesson it’s begging to teach.

One bummer was the Newseum. As a former reporter, it sat high on my list of places to visit, but it closed for good back in January, which is another scary indicator the war on the freedom of the press is not going the way of free speech. Another thing to remember is no pictures at the National Archives, so there’s only the gift shop to remember viewing those indelible documents.

Books

People read like fiends on the right coast, not that they don’t on the left, but in D.C. people brought books with them into bars. That speaks volumes. I visited three of D.C.’s literary hubs on my trip: East City Book Shop, Solid State Books, and Capitol Hill Books. All cooler than Hell. While there I was sure to pick up books by George Pelecanos, D.C.’s staple crime writer, among other tomes to heft back as carry-on luggage. Capitol Hill also coughed up the Constitution for my library, not to mention a Declaration of Independence from the National Archives, since I’m a nerd and wanted them from the nexus.

Historic buildings

Where to begin with the architecture? It’s a trip in and of itself to visit the famous homes, the institutions, the churches, and everything in between. What I found most interesting were the row homes, some of which are jammed between high rises. They’re all over, some nicer in appearance than others, but all insanely expensive said the cab drivers. Also, churches are everywhere. Every. Where. D.C. has its own Chinatown, which is worth a visit, though it is smaller than Los Angeles or San Francisco’s. For a touristy nerd who doesn’t get out much, visual stimulation in architecture literally called out to you from every street corner.

Food

There’s some sexy eating to be had in Washington D.C. from the hot dog sellers on the corners to the finer, cattle cart dining found around the National Mall. I recommend a few places when you pay a visit. First off is Tortino Restaurant. They had the best Italian dishes around. Second, and within a leisurely stroll of Tortino, is Phillips Seafood and Steak. Great steak, great ambience, though it can get a bit noisy, so be ready for the din. For a real D.C. taste, also swing into Po Boy Jim. The joint had great hot sausage, an upstairs bar, and a good time.

Scary Stairs

There’s a famous scene in the film adaptation of William Peter Blatty’s book “The Exorcist” in which Father Damien Karras tumbles down seventy-some stairs to his death. Those steps where the scene was filmed can be found in the Georgetown neighborhood of D.C. For a fan of horror literature, director William Friedkin’s 1973 movie adaptation is a classic, which makes a visit to the Exorcist Steps a must on any vacation to the area. Just be sure to catch your breath since those stairs are steep mothers.

Oddly enough there were no copies of The Exorcist to be found at any of the local book sellers. Coincidence? Well, yeah, probably.

5 Historic Monterey Crimes and Criminals

T-6

It’s not easy to dwell on Monterey California’s criminal underbelly when picturing the angelic shoreline found along the Central Coast, but even windswept beauty has its ugly side. As a reporter I learned this firsthand when I worked the crime beat in Sedona, Arizona.

Never trust the postcard.

Monterey has had its share of interesting crimes over the years, from cold cases to mysterious fires that have destroyed communities and lives. Below are five of the area’s most interesting crimes and criminals, culled from a variety of sources. Some glamorous, others terrifying, these Central Coast stories are the stuff of legend.


T-1
Tiburcio Vasquez

  1. The outlaw Tiburcio Vasquez

Vasquez started his criminal career at the young age of 17 after fleeing the scene of a murder with his cousin, the outlaw Anastacio Garcia. Thus began a bloody, dangerous life of crime and womanizing, the latter of which became something of a trademark for the man and would ultimately lead to his downfall. He was hanged in 1875. His last breath consisted of a single word, “Pronto.”

While his deeds took him far and wide, Tiburcio would often stay in Monterey County. His family lived across the street from the Monterey County Jail in downtown Monterey. Tiburcio was quite familiar with both locations.

Learn more about him here.


T-2
Manchester, a town that burned to the ground.

  1. Massacre Cave

What happened in Massacre Cave? Newspaper accounts reported a number of skeletons found there near the long-lost town of Manchester, which suspiciously burned to the ground around 1900, leaving a few people missing in the process. Decades later, the skeletal discovery occurred, leaving many to speculate as to what exactly occurred during this gold-crazy era of Monterey County’s history. It should also be noted there are those who claim the area is not the site of a murder but a Native burial ground.

Read more here.


T-3

  1. The lynching of Matt Tarpey

A determined crowd converged on the Monterey Jail in 1873 to settle things with alleged murderer, Matthew Tarpey, who had been jailed for shooting a woman in the back over a land squabble. Tarpey, a well-to-do member of a vigilante squad that operated in Santa Cruz and Monterey County, expected help to come for him. It didn’t. He was hung on a Monday evening after being forcibly removed from the jail by a lynch mob.

Get the Tarpey story right here.


T-4
The 1967 Cannery Row fire.

  1. The Cannery Row Fire of 1967

Arson was believed to be the cause of the Carmel Canning Company fire in 1967 that caused more than $250 million in damages to Cannery Row, which happened to be a tad seedier than the tourist mecca it is today. Despite being less than glamorous, more than 65 firefighters responded to the scene and quickly doused the Christmas Eve fire. Perhaps too quickly for the liking of whoever set the blaze.

See more here.


T-5
One of the newspaper headlines from 1977.

  1. The grisly murders of four Seaside women

The year 1977 wasn’t an ordinary one for residents of Seaside, California. While crime was more common there than it is today, the discovery of four female family members stabbed to death made for shocking, horrifying headlines. Grandmother Josephine Smith, her daughter Suzanne Harris, Suzanne’s daughter Rachel Harris, and Suzanne’s niece Renee Ferguson were each found murdered in their home. While a family relative was eventually captured, the murders had the small community on edge.

Read about the case here.

 

 

The Media, that blobby entity for good

News.jpg

It’s super easy to blame the media for not covering the news we want. Whether or not it’s true, we blame them because they’re an easy target – a blobby, nebulous entity with an ulterior motive. And even though we live on a planet where everyone videos everything, where everyone wants to be an influencer, and everyone under 50 wants to enjoy viral Brad Pitt-level success, there remains a need for journalism.

  • Why didn’t the media cover Puerto Rico better?
  • Why isn’t the media coming down harder on Trump after that crazy speech?
  • The media won’t cover female presidential candidates?
  • Why isn’t the media right where I want them to be right when I expect it?

Is it possible those who ask aren’t watching or reading enough news? Are they asking “Where’s the media coverage of (this story) or (that story)?” on social media because they only get their news from social media? Does it need to be written that news on social media is cherry-picked and not all-inclusive of the journalistic engine at large?

Does it need to be written that news agencies follow trends like the rest of us, reporting on news that affects our daily lives, and even news we’ve told them we want to read? The Kardashians are famous because we’ve made them famous.

Listen, the media are people who report the news. Their role is not to editorialize your interests. They try, but they often fail. And it’s not their job. A reporter reports.

Imagine if no one offered news anymore and your only source of information came from social media. How much of it would you believe? Forget a socialist society, forget living under a dictatorship, we’d all be a labor class ruled by a few rich people who consider us no better than bugs. We’d be uninformed, uneducated, and have no voice.

That’s what the news is, a voice for the voiceless. It strives to create an informed populace. On it’s best day, it’s there to tell you why things happened the way they happened. On its worst day, it grovels to those who want to kill the messenger, then bitch when there’s no mail.

When complaining of media neglect, or a lack of reporting on something you find important, check yourself first by following simple rules of conduct.

  • Were these news agencies absent from this story because they’re understaffed? These days many are
  • Check online to verify your claim of news-neglect. There are probably stories
  • Question the source. Where did you get the information you’re sharing?
  • Lastly, question the motivation. Is there a reason this wasn’t covered in a satisfactory way? Remember the 2016 election; if you found it on social media and you can’t tell it’s from a reliable news agency, it’s click bait

If there’s one thing to take away from this rant it’s this; your blobby entities need support. We have to fight the trick. The real blobby, nebulous entity is the group trying to convince the public not to believe what they read and to even hate those who strive to give you a voice.

Down with those A-holes.